Archive for medium format digital

Super Wide: Cambo’s WRE-CA Adapter for Canon Lenses

Posted in General, Landscapes, Nature & Wildlife with tags , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2017 by kendoophotography
1 Queens Bath

Queen’s Bath, Kauai, Hawaii. Cambo WRS 1600, Phase IQ3 100, Cambo WRE-CA, Canon 17mm TS-E

The Phase One XF mated to the IQ3 100MP digital back is an incredible camera system. But when traveling or photographing landscapes, I much prefer using a technical camera. The Cambo WRS 1600 simply provides me with more photographic enjoyment and satisfaction. The Cambo allows full movements with tilt, swing, shift, rise and fall. The new WRS 1600 allows the user to select landscape or portrait orientation without removing the digital back.  It is also lighter and smaller than a Phase XF, which makes using a technical camera much easier for traveling and hiking.

A week before traveling to Hawaii to meet up with Don Libby of Iron Creek Photography, Cambo asked me if I would be interested in trying the then soon to be released Cambo WRE-CA lens adapter with a Canon 17mm TS-E on my Cambo WRS 1600 and Phase One IQ3 100 medium format digital back.  Absolutely, I replied!

2 Cambo 1600 with WRE-CA

Cambo WRS 1600 fitted with WRE-CA lens adapter with Canon 17mm TS-E

Cambo’s new WRE-CA adapter allows the Cambo technical cameras to use Canon EF lenses, and of particular note, the Canon 17mm TS-E. The “W” in the Cambo WRS series stands for “wide.” But when using the WRE-CA adapter with Canon’s 17mm TS-E, wide now becomes “super wide.” And I emphasize super wide. The Canon 17mm TS-E has a 62mm image circle, which just covers the large, full-frame medium format sensor of the Phase One IQ3 100. Available movements are minimal, but with a field of view this wide, there is usually plenty of room for cropping any vignetting resulting from using slight movements. Did I mention super wide angle?

2A WRE-CA composite

Cambo WRE-CA. A small lithium battery power bank with micro-USB cord is used to recharge the battery inside of the adapter. I added a Canon body cap to protect the electronic contacts on the adapter during travel.

3

Top view of the WRE-CA adapter.

The Cambo WRE-CA attaches to the Cambo technical camera, allowing Canon EF mount lenses to be used. The real limitation is the image circle of the lens used, and of interest, is using lenses that provide a unique perspective. The Canon 17mm TS-E shines in this regard.  The adapter is easy to use as can be expected. Once turned on, adjusting the dial on the right side sets the desired aperture on the lens, which is displayed on a small screen. If the screen were to provide any functions beyond displaying the aperture and focal length of the lens, I would want a bigger and/or brighter screen. Of minor note, I would also prefer if the adapter when turned on would default to the last f/stop setting used.

The Cambo WRE-CA was designed specifically to be used with the electronic shutter available only at this time on the Phase One IQ3 series 100 megapixel digital back.  I do hope that Phase One sees fit to extend the electronic shutter feature set by firmware update to its IQ1 series 100 megapixel digital backs as well.  The electronic shutter avoids vibrations but does require familiarization, particularly with regard to moving objects in the scene. Moving water does not seem to be an issue, but other moving objects, depending on their prominence in the scene, can become skewed by the electronic shutter. Setting a faster shutter speed can help, but sometimes not as much as is expected.

4 setting up bts

Setting up the Cambo WRS 1500, WRE-CA, and Canon 17mm TSE

5 Albizia Tree crop

Albizia Invasion. Kauai, HI. A “crop” of the Albizia tree to make it a little more prominent in the frame.

There is nothing quite like the angle of view provided by the Canon 17mm TS-E on a full frame medium format digital sensor. It is incredibly wide.  Any issues that I had in Hawaii with this ultra-wide system were relatively minor and can be simply attributed to user-error and familiarizing myself with the Canon 17mm TS-E.  It may have been this particular lens that I was using but the infinity marker on the lens barrel was definitely “inaccurate” and not to be trusted. Fortunately, live view on the Phase One IQ3 100 made it extremely easy to manually focus. Lens flare can be an issue and is something to be aware of when photographing landscapes. Simply replacing the lens cap made taking a dark frame relatively easy, except when using filters.

6 Waimea Valley

WonderPana filter system on the Canon 17mm TS-E. 2-stop graduated filter.

7 Waimea Valley

Waimea Canyon, Kauai, Hawaii.  Cambo WRS 1600, WRE-CA adapter, Canon 17mm TS-E, WonderPana filter system with two-stop filter.

7A Cambo with WonderPana Filters

Behind the Scenes with the Cambo WRS 1600, WRE-CA Adapter, Canon 17mm TS-E with WonderPana filter system

8 WonderPana

Fotodiox WonderPana 66 FreeArc filter system for the Canon 17mm TS-E.

I chose to use the WonderPana 66 FreeArc filter system for the Canon 17mm TS-E. The filter system uses 145mm screw-in neutral density filters and 6.6” x 8.5” graduated filters. These filters are big. For Hawaii, my kit included a 4-stop and 10 stop ND filter and a 2-stop soft grad. My back pack was full of filters as I also carried along the new Wine Country Camera filter system for my Rodenstock HR40 and HR70 lenses.  To take a dark frame when using filters on the Canon 17mm TS-E, I found it easiest to simply remove the entire WonderPana filter assembly and attach the Canon lens cap.

9

Turtle Bay Edamame. Focus on the Canon 17mm TS-E was set about one-foot away from the Edamame.

10

The field of view on the Canon 17mm TSE on the Cambo and IQ3 100 is incredibly wide.  I took several images with the Cambo WRS 1600 in the same locked position, changing only between the Canon 17mm TSE and the Rodenstock HR40mm.

11

Turtle Bay. Original capture. Cambo WRS 1600 WRE-CA and Canon 17mm TS-E

12 B&W Crop

Turtle Bay. B&W crop. Cambo WRS 1600, Cambo WRE-CA and Canon 17mm TS-E

13

Old Episcopal Church, Oahu, Hawaii. Cambo WRS 1600, Cambo WRE-CA and Canon 17mm TS-E

13A Behind the Scenes

Behind the Scenes

14

Japanese Temple. Oahu, Hawaii. Cambo WRS 1600, Cambo WRE-CA, Canon 17mm TS-E, Phase One IQ3 100

The cost of the Cambo WRE-CA lens adapter is approximately $1449 and can be purchased from Capture Integration in Atlanta, GA.  A Canon 17mm TS-E is approximately $2,150. This super wide-angle option is about $6,000 less than a Rodenstock HR32 with center filter, which is a much larger and fragile lens.

15 Carmel Mission bts

Behind the scenes at the Carmel Mission Basilica

16 Carmel Mission Basilica Field of View

Comparing the field of view with the Canon 17mm TS-E and the Rodenstock HR40mm.

18 Carmel Mission Kitchen bts

Behind the scenes. The Carmel Mission kitchen illustrates a really tight image space.

17 Carmel Mission kitchen

Cambo WRS 1600, Cambo WRE-CA, Canon 17mm TS-E, Phase One IQ3 100

The advantage of using the Cambo WRE-CA is that it allows the use of Canon EF mount lenses, bringing distinct views or unusual qualities to the Cambo line of technical cameras.  Photographer and www.GetDPI.com family member, Jawad Malik (see, www.untroubledland.com), has already adapted a Leica R 180mm f/2.8 APO lens to Canon EF mount for use with the Cambo WRE-CA. Jawad reports that the performance of the Leica R 180mm f/2.8 APO is excellent.  Jawad also tried the Leica 280mm f/4 on the Cambo with the Cambo WRE-CA, but the image circle of the lens is slightly too small to cover a full frame medium format sensor, but would probably be excellent on smaller medium format sensor cameras using Cambo’s other lens adapters.  Again, the image circle of the chosen lens is the limitation.  The Canon 17mm TS-E provides a very distinct wide angle of view. Objectionable distortion appears to be easily addressed by programs such as IMADIO fisheye lens plug-in for Photoshop.  Adding the Canon 17mm TS-E to the lens profiles in Capture One Pro 10 would also be a welcome addition.

Kudos to Cambo for their ingenuity and craftsmanship in adding both flexibility and features to their technical cameras. Fit and finish of the adapter is excellent. The technology of the WRE-CA has been extended to other camera systems such as the Cambo Actus and even the newly released medium format Fuji GFX camera. The Cambo WRE-CA lens adapter is on my shopping list. I am told that we should have the Cambo WRE-CA at the Capture Integration (Pigs) workshop (aka Don & Ken’s Anti-Workshop) in Bluff, Utah this April 2017.  See you there!

Ken Doo, March 2017

You can see some of my landscape photography at www.houseoflandscapes.com

My fine art printing website is www.carmelfineartprinting.com

Specializing in Wall Portraiture at www.kendoophotography.com

 

ADDENDUM:  April 2017 marked our 8th CI/Pigs medium format digital workshop—which was held in Bluff, Utah. The Cambo WRE-CA lens adapter was there, including its cousin for the Cambo Actus DB and the version for the newly released Fuji GFX camera. The angle of view provided by the Cambo WRE-CA with the Canon TS-E is incredible. I am amazed every time I use it!CF002439

House on Fire, outside Blanding, Utah. Phase One IQ3 100, Cambo WRS 1600, Cambo WRE-CA with Canon 17mm TS-E. About 5mm fall and cropped in.  The Cambo WRE-CA lens adapters (and other Cambo adapters) can be purchased from www.captureintegration.com

Ken Doo

May 2017

The SMDV Alpha Speedbox: Lighting on the Go

Posted in General with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 24, 2016 by kendoophotography
SMDV Alpha Speedbox with adapters for Profoto, Bowens, Elinchrom, and Balcar.

SMDV Alpha Speedbox with speedring adapters for Profoto, Bowens, Elinchrom, and Balcar.

Introduction

Technology and development is fast paced in the world of digital photography. Every year (or every other year) manufacturers introduce dozens of new innovative tools and equipment at large photography shows such as Photokina in Germany or Photoplus in New York. Innovation may be large or small, but if a new product can actually make my job as a professional photographer easier, that is what makes it a worthwhile investment to me.  The SMDV Alpha Speedbox is one of those innovative worthwhile investments that has found a place in my studio, and especially when working on location.  When surrounded by announcements of the latest fast lenses and 100 megapixel medium format digital backs, it may be difficult to get excited about a studio lighting modifier. But I think the SMDV Alpha Speedbox does a pretty good job here. SMDV was established by JS Kim in 2003 and is a relatively small company headquartered in Busan, South Korea. The SMDV Alpha Speedbox is not an inexpensive lighting modifier and should not be confused with cheap photography products cranked out by some Asian companies. On the contrary, the quality of materials used here is top-notch. Pricing starts at about $300 depending on mount selected and the size of the modifier. Warranty service and support is provided by SMDV USA. The US Distributor is www.legioaerium.com

36" Alpha Speedbox and 44" Alpha Speedbox shown with optional grid for more light control

36″ Alpha Speedbox and 44″ Alpha Speedbox shown with optional grid for more light control

Background

The SMDV Alpha Speedbox is a parabolic softbox designed for studio lights. It is available in 32”, 36”, 40″, and 44” sizes. In a sea of “parabolic” lighting modifiers, what makes the SMDV Alpha Speedbox standout is the quality of its feature-set in a packable lighting kit for working on location. Oh, yes—and it’s easy to use and speedy to set-up, hence its namesake.

Following my review of the KPS T5 geared ballhead, the US Distributor for the SMDV Alpha Speedbox asked if I would be interested in trying their relatively new softbox. Eh, not really I replied, but then again I had just acquired a Profoto B2 on location lighting kit from Capture Integration in Atlanta, along with a Profoto B1 and Profoto Acute2 B600 pack also for working on location. I was not impressed with Profoto’s diminutive 2’ OCF Octobox, so maybe trying some new on location lighting modifiers wasn’t such a bad idea after all. And SMDV had just added a Profoto speedring adapter for the Alpha Speedbox. Speedring adapters are also available for Bowens, Elinchrom, Broncolor, Hensel, and Balcar.

At the end of September 2015, I received two Alpha Speedboxes, Profoto speedring adapters, and accessories. No compensation was received from SMDV. I was asked to simply use the Speedboxes and provide input and a review. Unlike many reviews where a product is “used” for a scant few hours, I used the 36” and 44” Alpha Speedboxes extensively over a period of three months in a variety of situations both in studio and on location, primarily in portraiture as well as at two destination weddings.

SMDV Alpha Speedbox softcase shown inside my hardcase, along with lightstand and Profoto umbrella---ready to go.

SMDV Alpha Speedbox soft case (similar to a tripod soft case) shown inside my hard case, along with light stand and Profoto umbrella—ready to go.

Optional grid comes in its own soft case.

Optional grid comes in its own soft case.

SMDV Grid in case WEB

The Meat and Potatoes

The Alpha Speedbox is a parabolic softbox with an internal baffle and a removable outer diffuser. Once set-up, both the internal baffle and outer diffuser may be left attached to the Speedbox. Using the Profoto adapter ring adds several inches to the length of the modifier when folded.  The 36″ Speedbox (with Profoto adapter) is about 28-inches in length when folded; the 44″ speedbox slightly longer of course. The diameter of the Alpha Speedbox when folded is just under 8-inches. The entire kit is easily packed into its included “to-go” zippered soft case, which is similar to a tripod case with handles and shoulder strap. The grid comes with its own protective soft case. An available cloth honeycomb grid is easily attached for further light control. I was very surprised when I first handled the grid. It is a slightly heavier material and its quality is surprisingly better than grids I have seen from Profoto. The grid attaches easily to the outside of the Alpha Speedbox with velcro tabs.  The optional grid is expensive, starting at approximately $150-$190, but the quality is also apparent. The grid is a special order item that is hand-made in Korea. I am told that an optional deflector plate will also soon be available providing lighting similar to a beauty dish.

The Alpha Speedbox, “Alpha” referring to its aluminum construction and metal speedring, is a twelve-sided dodecagon shaped softbox, as opposed to a more popular six or eight-sided octobox. The dodecagon shape is more circular and lends itself to better catch-lights. The ribs are metal and workmanship and quality of materials is excellent. The reflective material is held taut by the unique engineering of the modifier. The modifier is quickly deployed in about thirty seconds—not minutes—simply by pulling each steel rib upwards until it clicks into place. I have found that by skipping every other one and then rotating the modifier until each rib is locked into place is the fastest method to deploy this modifier. There is no fumbling with color-coded ribs into speed ring slots or struggling to set-up a large softbox. Ease and speed of set-up is particularly important for photographers who often work alone or without the luxury of assistants. Few other lighting modifiers offer both the speed and ease of set-up as the SMDV Alpha Speedbox, and certainly not with the same level of light control and available accessories.  All this—in an easy to pack along, lighting kit.  Putting the modifier away is even faster: simply squeeze the six tab locks together and the modifier instantly collapses down ready to put into its case.

SMDV Alpha Speedbox with Profoto Speedring Adapter

SMDV Alpha Speedbox with Profoto Speedring Adapter. The band attachments are now even stronger with a new reinforced rubber.

So, how is the SMDV Alpha Speedbox as a portrait lighting modifier on location?  Put it this way, if given the choice, the SMDV Alpha Speedbox 90 (36″) is my first choice. I had a hard time deciding whether to purchase the SMDV Alpha 36″ or 44″ Speedbox or both. In the end I opted for the SMDV Alpha Speedbox 90 (36″). It is a nice size yet still easily maneuverable on location.  For a destination wedding in Sedona, Arizona, I chose to use the SMDV Alpha Speedbox 90 (36″) paired with Profoto’s more portable B2 lighting kit.  Special thanks to Don Libby of IronCreekPhotography in Tucson, AZ for providing the short video clip.

https://youtu.be/V5eqIuWHgp0

Engagement Session in Sedona, AZ. Phase XF with IQ180, Phase SK 75-150mm LS; SMDV Alpha Speedbox with Profoto B2

Engagement Session in Sedona, AZ. Phase XF with IQ180, Phase SK 75-150mm LS; SMDV Alpha Speedbox with Profoto B2

SMDV Alpha Speedbox with grid, Profoto B2

Profoto B2 and SMDV Alpha Speedbox with optional grid.

As a portrait photographer, I often work alone. Being able to set up quickly is a value that I place a great premium. For individuals, couples, or even small groupings, the SMDV Alpha Speedboxes are an excellent choice. I like the flexibility that the Alpha Speedboxes offer with removable diffusion panels, grids, and soon a deflector plate. Its parabolic shape makes it easy to feather the light when needed, and its flexible design makes it easy to change the quality of light from a diffused source to a more distinct light.

SMDV Alpha Speedbox with grid

SMDV Alpha Speedbox with grid

Packing “light and tight” is a necessity to fly across the country for a destination wedding. Setting up quickly for portraits after the wedding ceremony and racing the setting sun can be a challenge.  The SMDV Alpha Speedbox with Profoto B2 lights excels easily at both. The design of the Alpha Speedbox and its flexibility as a modifier make it an easy choice to take on location.

Parents Portrait with the SMDV Alpha Speedbox 90 (36") at a destination wedding. Canon 5Ds and Profoto B2

Parents Portrait with the SMDV Alpha Speedbox 90 (36″) at a destination wedding. Canon 5Ds and Profoto B2

What It’s Not

The SMDV Alpha Speedbox is not a knock-off. The SMDV Alpha Speedbox is not cheaply made.  And the SMDV Alpha Speedbox is not at all like Adorama’s Glow Parapop modifier. During the course of my review, another photographer pointed out to me the Adorama Glow Parapop as having similar features. I was intrigued, so I bought Adorama’s Glow Parapop 38-inch modifier, a bundled Glow Parapop kit with a Balcar mount for Paul Buff’s Alien Bees or Einstein monolights, to compare.  Apparently some parts were licensed by SMDV to Rimelite who in turn sold them to Adorama for their Glow series. The Adorama marketing description made the two modifiers seem strikingly very similar. But once in hand, it is abundantly clear that there is no comparison. It is not even close.  The reflective materials and the diffusion panel materials are markedly different. The quality of materials and design of the SMDV Alpha Speedbox are clearly superior.

Not comparable in shape, quality of materials, or light output.

Not comparable in shape, quality of materials, or light output.

The SMDV Alpha Speedbox was designed with studio lights in mind. The speedring and adapters are made of aluminum to handle heat generated by modeling lamps. The ribs on the SMDV Alpha Speedbox are made of steel. The ribs on the Parapop are fiberglass. The Parapop is advertised by Adorama and recommended by them for use with studio lights, but to do so I think is irresponsible. The provided Balcar adapter is held in place by some really tiny screws, into the plastic Parapop base.  Really tiny screws. Plastic base. Really inappropriate. It is a disaster waiting to happen—and it did.

Tiny screws shown with the Balcar adapter. Trouble waiting to happen...

Tiny screws shown with the Balcar adapter. Trouble waiting to happen…

Within minutes of attaching the Glow Parapop to the Einstein monolight, the Parapop came crashing down on the studio floor. The heat from the Einstein modeling lamp had expanded the plastic screw mounts, and the tiny screws holding the Balcar mount adapter in place slipped out! Both the plastic mount and Balcar adapter remained very hot for quite some time.  Luckily no damage was caused to the Einstein monolight tube.  The Glow Parapop is not designed for studio light use (as was marketed). Obviously I was not able to do further studio testing of the Parapop. But frankly, in light of the glaring differences in materials used, there is no legitimate comparison to the SMDV Alpha Speedboxes to begin with. I found the two release tabs on the Parapop plastic base were very difficult to squeeze and close the fiberglass tines on the modifier.  In contrast, the SMDV Alpha Speedbox uses metal rods which easily collapse down when released. The six pairs of tab locks on the Alpha Speedbox provide added strength and tautness to the modifier. Oh, and by the way, the Glow Parapop “38-inch modifier” is not 38-inches—it really is only 36-inches.  SMDV does make a different line of modifiers for speedlite use, but even those are made with steel ribs and the same high quality diffusion material that is used on the Alpha Speedboxes. Note the differences in diffusion panels and light quality in the image shown above between the SMDV Alpha Speedbox and the Parapop.

Inner baffle differences in both size and quality of materials used. The SMDV diffusion panel is markedly better.

Inner baffle differences in both size and quality of materials used. The SMDV diffusion panel is markedly better.

Note the differences in reflective materials and tautness of the modifier

Note the differences in reflective materials and tautness of the modifier

Conclusion

The SMDV Alpha Speedbox is an excellent lighting modifier. It is easy to use, truly quick to set up, and fast to break down. SMDV has put together a nice on location lighting kit in a single bag.  I am able to pack the SMDV Alpha Speedbox in its softcase, SMDV grid, a light stand, and a Profoto shallow medium umbrella (for those bigger group portraits) in my own hard case for additional protection when traveling. The hard case that I use is a US Art Supply 10-inch drafting tube that telescopes from 36 to 59-inches.  One of the things that I like about small companies like SMDV is that they are responsive and focused on providing high quality photographic gear for professionals.  The owner of SMDV, JS Kim, was also a professional photographer and seems to have a good understanding of photographer’s concerns.  The quality of materials and workmanship on the SMDV Alpha Speedbox is excellent and makes the investment in this lighting modifier worthwhile. I look forward to trying the optional deflector plate that will be available shortly.  I am also told that SMDV is working on Alpha Speedbox Stripboxes too.

SMDV Alpha Speedbox

SMDV Alpha Speedbox: Professional lighting modifier to go

After using the SMDV Alpha Speedbox on dozens of individual portraits, engagement sessions, and travelling with it for two destination weddings, I’m glad to have the SMDV Alpha Speedbox as part of my lighting arsenal.  For professional photographers that work frequently on location, the SMDV Alpha Speedbox is a great lighting modifier to-go kit.  You can obtain more information or order the SMDV Alpha Speedbox online from the US distributor of SMDV products,  www.legioaerium.com

Ken Doo, www.kendoophotography.com

Ken Doo has been a professional portrait photographer for fifteen years, with a boutique studio in Carmel, California. He and co-conspirator Don Libby lead the Capture Integration in Carmel medium format digital “not a workshop-workshop” sometimes affectionately referred to simply as, “Pigs.”  Ken is also a fine art printer for artists and photographers, and recently launched his fine art printing website, www.carmelfineartprinting.com  He enjoys long walks along the beach, holding hands, meaningful conversation, and sarcastic humor.

 

New Year New Approaches

Posted in Events, General, Landscapes, Nature & Wildlife, Portraiture, Weddings and Bridal with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 1, 2016 by kendoophotography
Me and my boys with  Grandma in studio.

Me and my boys with Grandma in studio. Phase XF, IQ180, Schneider 40-80mm LS.

The New Year holiday is often a time of introspection and promises of resolutions for the near future. When in reality it is something that everyone should be doing throughout the year. I am constantly gauging for myself what works and what may be improved. 2015 was a very busy and good year, but also one filled with the stresses of how to handle and protect a loved one afflicted with dementia. It hasn’t been easy. But we’ve also been very fortunate to have the resources and discipline to do what is both best and necessary. We have moved my mom from the Bay area to Monterey, making it much easier to spend time with her. It was definitely the right decision and just in time for the new year. There won’t be broken commitments to the latest fad diet or unused gym memberships–that’s never been a problem for our family! 2016 will be a reaffirmation of family and the things that are important to me in life. Professionally, I have decided to remain focused on fine portraiture, commercial photography, and fine art printing for artists and photographers. I will no longer do corporate event work. I will limit the studio to one wedding per year (yup, only one).  And yes, that means taking more time to travel for landscape photography.  2016 is going to be a great year.  kmd.

Light Ignition Provides Alternative Profoto Reflectors

Posted in General with tags , , , on October 29, 2015 by kendoophotography
Light Ignition Magnum clone and the original Profoto Magnum Reflector

Light Ignition Magnum clone and the original Profoto Magnum Reflector

Profoto lighting equipment has always garnered the respect of professional photographers worldwide for the quality of their studio lighting equipment and their modifiers. That high respect also commands high prices for their equipment. The Profoto Magnum Reflector retails at B&H Photo for $327. The Magnum reflector is actually known to increase light output by approximately one full f/stop. When using comparatively lower powered, albeit lighter and more portable, lights such as the new Profoto B2, the use of the Magnum Reflector is a great accessory making it easier to overpower the sun. The extra stop of power means the diminutive B2 becomes equal in output to its bigger, heavier, and more powerful brother, the B1.  Of course, the Magnum Reflector is a perfect complement to the B1 as well!  Light Ignition, distributed through Ebay by a Chinese company, sells a reflector for Profoto studio lights that by no mistake is a clone of the venerable original Profoto Magnum, yet at a much lower cost of approximately $215 shipped.  I had to try it myself.  As you can see in the above photo, the modifiers are nearly identical. Fit and finish is very similar, with the edge being given to Profoto. The original Magnum feels just a tad heavier, though both seem to be well made from metal. The original Magnum has a better lip as can be seen in the photo.

Inside view of both reflectors.

Inside view of both reflectors.

Reflector mount view

Reflector mount view

The rubber mount of the Profoto Magnum is softer and more pliable. The Light Ignition rubber is noticeably firmer though it may soften with use. As you can see in the photo, the Light Ignition mount is not as concentric as the Profoto Magnum. The stiffness of the Light Ignition mount made it slightly more difficult to install on my Profoto B1 light.  The insides of the reflectors are nearly identical.  I tested each reflector using a Profoto B1 with the frosted glass dome and with the standard flat frosted glass plate. Although designed to be used with the optional glass dome, an increase in power by approximately a full stop was still noted with the standard frosted plate glass cover over the B1 tube.  Quality of light may be better with the optional glass dome in place. Unfortunately the glass dome is available only for the B1 and not the B2. Regardless, I have noted an increase in output of one full stop using the Magnum reflector with the Profoto B2. In this comparison, each reflector was set at approximately position 6 on the B1. From a distance of approximately twelve feet, I measured f/22 at 1/125th, ISO100. The Profoto Magnum measured about 1/10 of a stop higher output than the Light Ignition reflector, and certainly well within the margin of error of this informal test to be a wash. Both reflectors also work well with Honeygrids. The Light Ignition Magnum clone Profoto rubber mount is probably its only shortcoming, though that may get better with use. I find that the Light Ignition reflector does what it is supposed to and provides a suitable alternative to its more expensive brother.  www.kendoophotography.com

As also stated elsewhere in this blog, no compensation has been received by distributors/manufacturers of equipment that I may review. Sometimes I like it, buy it, and share my experiences with fellow professional photographers.  ken

 

Three Studio Artist Tour Hosted by Emy Ledbetter, Sandy Robinson, and Arlene Stigum

Posted in Events, General with tags , , , , , , on September 23, 2015 by kendoophotography

Studio Tour 2015

 

Don’t miss this three artist studio tour being held this weekend in Carmel, by Artists Emy Ledbetter, Sandy Robinson, and Arlene Stigum.  Studios open September 26 + 27, 2015 from 12 Noon to 5 PM.  Details on the flyer!  Both Sandy and Emy also have featured artists galleries at www.carmelfineartprinting.com ken  For more information on fine art printing on archival OBA free canvas and fine art papers, contact the studio or Carmel Fine Art Printing & Reproduction, the area’s premier fine art printer.  From Vision to Print!  Easy online ordering of your photos on canvas or fine art papers.

Studio Tour 2015, Better-1

Tethering with the Surface Pro: An Evolution of Clamping Choices!

Posted in General, Landscapes, Nature & Wildlife with tags , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2015 by kendoophotography
Some of the clamping options used while tethering with the Surface Pro through the generations.

Some of the clamping options used while tethering with the Surface Pro through the generations. ©2015 Ken Doo Photography

Over a year I ago, I first wrote a blog article concluding that the Microsoft’s Surface Pro with touch screen interface and USB3 capability was a game changer for those tethering with Phase One IQ series and Leaf Credo medium format digital backs. Now with the Surface Pro 3 and soon to be released Surface Pro 4, that still remains true today. The power of a laptop in a tablet form, the Surface Pro using a full version of Phase One’s Capture One Pro to view full resolution RAW files far surpasses anything offered by viewing via WiFi or puny JPEG files. Even for DSLRs, tethering with a Surface Pro offers great tethering functionality for those who seek a portable tethering option.  Originally I used and recommended the Arkon Clamp to hold the SP2, which can be seen at the rear of the above photo. Since that time, the search for the perfect clamp has ensued, all offering improvements over the first generation Arkon Clamp, but also with known limitations or compromises. The Wolf Clamp (pictured in the above photo on the left) added a pano rail with end clamp and RRS FAS clamp to hold the tripod head and camera. While the Wolf Clamp added increased capability, it is also very stout and bulky making it extremely difficult to pack into a camera bag. It is not inexpensive either. The Pig Clamp (pictured above, right) with its flat stature is perfect for hiking, but its light weight also meant not being as stout as the others. The Pig Clamp also uses the same pano rail and FAS clamp as the Wolf Clamp. The Pig Clamp is inexpensive, and I still have a few available on the shelf.  While some choose simply to handhold the Surface Pro, others have opted for a tripod stone bag, such as Vanguard’s tripod stone bag.  But I wanted something better.  So my search continued, resulting in what I feel is the best possible clamping solution(s) for tethering with the Surface Pro on location.  Don Libby of Iron Creek Photography and I call this the Capture Location Integrated Tethering System. There are actually three versions, but as you will see below, I greatly favor one over the others.

Capture Location Integrated Tethering Systems for the Surface Pro.

Capture Location Integrated Tethering Systems for the Surface Pro. Version 1 on the left; Version 2 on the right. Not shown here is Version 3—see below.

There are three variations of this latest generation clamping system, with two using the same RRS MPR-CL II pano rail (or similar), RRS FAS clamp, an Arca Swiss compatible plate, and all using a Giottos Professional Mini-Ball head, as pictured above. Using the RRS Duo Package rail may give slightly more vertical adjustment.  Stay tuned here to the blog as I may be updating the shopping list to include other recommended rails that may give slightly more vertical adjustment, attaching the ballhead directly to a 200mm multi-purpose rail as opposed to used a permanent quick release attachment point.  My preferred system is the magnetic CLIT Clamp on the shown above on the left, but quickly I am liking the last magnetic CLIT Clamp tripod variation best. It also uses a small metal cheeseplate, metal mounting plates, rare earth magnets, and a Urban Armor Gear (UAG) protective case for the Surface Pro.  Don’t worry—a shopping list of all the necessary items is at the bottom of this blog article.  The CLIT Clamp version 1, as illustrated above, thin metal mounting plates (with 3M self adhesive) are adhered to the metal cheeseplate. The metal plates give more surface area for the adhesive to grab onto.  You will need to cut a metal plate into two pieces using metal sheers or heavy duty scissors. Use a hammer to gently tap the cut edges flat and smooth before using the self-adhesive to apply the plates to the cheeseplate.  Two Nite Ize rare earth magnets are then glued onto the cheeseplate using the included 3M VHB tape. (note: don’t skimp on the magnets—get the ones from Nite Ize). A thin metal mounting plate is then fastened with the adhesive onto the back of the UAG case, at the top of the leg, making sure to leave just enough space so that the leg can fully extend without obstruction. There will be a slight overhang by the metal plate on the leg, but it will not interfere with use of the leg of closing the leg into the UAG case.  Make sure to use rubbing alcohol or lens wipes to clean all surfaces before applying adhesives.  You must use the UAG case. I tried to use the Surface Pro with the metal plates directly on the back of the Surface Pro with only limited success. The strength of the magnets will interfere with some functions of C1Pro (such as the loupe) on parts of the touch screen directly opposite the magnets. For those wishing additional magnetic shielding, a thin piece of MuMetal or any sheet will further increase magnetic shielding permeation and saturation levels. In my testing, the UAG case is more than sufficient and works beautifully.

 

UAG case with thin metal plate attached to the leg. The leg remains full functional and the metal plate is barely noticeable.

UAG case with thin metal plate attached to the leg. The leg remains fully functional and the metal plate is barely noticeable. Can be used on all CLITS Clamp versions, but is required on versions 1 and 3.

Magnetic Capture Location Integrated Tethering System shown alone and with Surface Pro attached.

Magnetic Capture Location Integrated Tethering System (Ver 1) shown alone and with Surface Pro attached. Cambo technical camera on Arca Swiss Cube, attached to RRS FAS clamp and MPR CLII rail. Giottos mini ballhead is attached with a AS quick release plate.

The rare earth magnet CLITS Clamp is stable and easy to use. It is fast and easily adjustable. And it packs well. I believe that this latest Surface Pro clamping system, versions 1, 2, and 3, offers the best in both capability, ease of use, and portability.  As you can see in the video below, the use of the rare earth magnets makes attaching the Surface Pro an easy and fast proposition.  

For those not wishing to use a UAG case, the CLITS Clamp version 2 can be adapted using the same pano rail, FAS clamp, and Giottos Professional Mini-ballhead with Desmond top clamp with lever quick release.  Using 3M VHB tape, a quick release plate is attached to the back of the Surface Pro, taking care not to obstruct use of the leg hinge.  Alternatively, a quick release plate could also be attached to the UAG case using 3M VHB tape.  Apply rubbing alcohol or a lens wipe to clean the area prior to applying the adhesive tape and quick release plate to the Surface Pro. A small Desmond lever quick release is then attached to the Giottos Professional Mini-ballhead.  The Desmond top clamp comes with a 3/8″ bushing reducer, which you should apply blue loctite before installing. The 3M VHB tape adhesive is very strong. If you need to remove the adhesive, apply rubbing alcohol with a cotton swab to loosen the bond and use either fishing line or dental floss to cut through the adhesive. Apply more rubbing alcohol to rub off the remaining adhesive.

Generic AS Compatible plate on the back of a Surface Pro for illustration.

Generic AS Compatible plate on the back of a Surface Pro for illustration of the CLITS Clamp version 2. Using a KPS Slim Plate provides a much lower profile. Attachment of a quick release plate on the UAG case is a preferred option too.

Using the KPS Slim Plate (SU7) would provide a much lower profile than a AS compatible plate

Using the KPS Slim Plate (SU7) would provide about a 50% lower profile than a AS compatible plate

For those who wish to have the absolute best, lowest profile solution for this version 2 of the CLITS Clamp, I highly recommend instead using the KPS Slim Plate system (SU7) and a either a compatible KPS top clamp on the Giottos Professional Mini-ballhead or a KPS mini ballhead. This is a more expensive quick release plate solution, but it is also has a much lower profile. The KPS Slim Plate is approximately 50% thinner than a standard AS plate.  See, www.legioaerium.com  The KPS ballhead also has a much higher rated capacity. KPS has agreed to send me their mini-ballhead to compare. For those seeking to use KPS Slim Plate compatible components, I advise contacting the US KPS distributor directly for best pricing and to order the correct parts.

CLITS Clamp version 3 features magnetic mounting but on the tripod leg

CLITS Clamp Version 3 features magnetic mounting but on the tripod leg. This version does not use the RRS FAS clamp or pano rail, yet still has good adjustment capabilities using the Giottos mini ball head. The compact CLITS Clamp Version 3 is my preferred clamp version.

The last version, the CLITS Clamp version 3, was put together after brainstorming with fellow professional photographer Paul Caldwell. This last clamp version is quickly becoming my favorite. This final version uses a Manfrotto Nano clamp. This small clamp has both 1/4″ and 3/8″ receiving screw holes. A one-inch headless 1/4″ bolt is screwed into the Nano clamp. The Giottos mini ballhead is then attached to the bolt. For a more capable mini ballhead, opt for the RRS BH-25PF instead. I actually recommend this RRS BH-25PF ballhead option instead. The same cheeseplate with the magnets in Version 1 is then attached to the ballhead.  This version allows attachment directly onto the tripod leg. In the photo above, the Nano clamp is able to attach to a RRS TVC 3 series tripod leg. Be careful not to over tighten and damage the tripod leg. A small strip of gaffers tape can be used if desired to protect the tripod leg.

Small, light, fast and easy to use. This version of the CLITS Clamp attaches to the tripod leg and is easily packed for on location tethering with the Surface Pro.

Small, light, fast and easy to use. This version of the CLITS Clamp attaches to the tripod leg and is easily packed for on location tethering with the Surface Pro.

This version of the CLITS Clamp is small, yet allows abundant movement of the Surface Pro tablet. The Surface Pro can be easily held or placed onto the clamp. Version 3 of the clamp is barely five inches in length and well under a pound in weight, making it easy to take along in a backpack pocket. I recommend storing the magnetic surface of the clamp away from the Surface Pro or other sensitive electronics.  What is great about the CLITS Clamp system is that it is modular and integrated, using many of the same parts, allowing users to easily modify the clamp from one version to the other.  Version 3 is my preferred tethering clamp and I will probably upgrade my Giottos ballhead with the RRS BH-25PF ballhead in the near future.

For further tips on tethering with the Surface Pro, there are a couple of threads on the forums at www.GetDPI.com and www.Luminous-Landscape.com. Or, feel free to drop me a note at my boutique portrait studio in Carmel or visit my fine art printing site, Carmel Fine Art Printing & Reproduction.  You can see my landscape work at www.houseoflandscapes.com  Ken Doo

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Capture Landscape Integrated Tethering System (magnetic clamp)

  1. RRS MPR-CL II (or similar), RRS Duo Package or Sunwayfoto pano rail; or Neewer 200mm multipurpose rail –the last option still requires a RRS FAS clamp or similar and the Giottos ball head attaches directly to the bar without quick release; no end clamp knob means more vertical adjustment for folks like Graham Welland who demand it.
  2. RRS FAS clamp
  3. Generic AS compatible quick release
  4. Giottos Professional Mini-ballhead
  5. Smallrig cheeseplate
  6. (2) Nite Ize rare earth magnets (for tablets)
  7. (2-4) Metal plates
  8. UAG case for Surface Pro 2 or Surface Pro 3

Capture Landscape Integrated Tethering System (QR plate)

Same RRS (or similar) pano rail components noted above and:

  1. Giottos Professional Mini-ballhead
  2. (2) generic quick release plate
  3. Desmond lever release top clamp
  4. 3M VHB tape

KPS Slim Plate low profile system:

  1. KPS SU7 slim plate
  2. 3M VHB tape
  3. KPS lever release top clamp
  4. KPS mini/compact ballhead with slim plate lever release
  5. generic AS release plate (for bottom of KPS ballhead)

Capture Landscape Integrated Tethering System (Tripod)

  1. Giottos Professional Mini Ball head
  2. Smallrig cheeseplate
  3. one inch long headless 1/4″ threaded bolt
  4. (2) Nite Ize rare earth magnets (for tablets)
  5. (2-4) metal plates
  6. Manfrotto Nano Clamp

For those wishing to use a higher capacity mini-ballhead, I suggest the RRS BH-25PF ballhead.   ken

The KPS T5 Geared Ballhead: In Search of the Elusive White Unicorn

Posted in General, Landscapes, Nature & Wildlife, Portraiture with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 15, 2015 by kendoophotography
Carmel Sunset

Carmel Sunset. ©2015 Ken Doo. Cambo WRS, Phase One IQ180, Rodenstock HR40 t/s, RRS TVC-33 with KPS T5-DV geared ballhead.

Background.

Photographers and camera bags are a lot like women and shoes. The endless search for the perfect camera bag is as evasive as the perfect pair of heels.  Finding the right tripod head is not much better. And if you are looking for a geared tripod head with an eye towards using it outside of the studio, the choices are slim indeed.

In 2009, Jack Flesher, wrote a review for the Luminous-Landscape on the Arca Swiss Cube, a really remarkable geared tripod head, which arguably set the standard for quality and precision in a geared tripod head. But the Cube also came at an incredible cost: approximately $1,700 for the Cube in a corrugated box version to $1,900 for a Cube packaged in a luxurious “Coach” leather bag that no one has quite figured out what the hell to do with once they have removed its precious cargo. Pure insanity, I thought when I first read Jack’s review. No tripod head is worth nearly two thousand dollars! But then I tried the Cube, and then I understood. The silent enabler, responsible for probably the most Cube sales to date, was right. Simply stated, the Arca Swiss Cube provides precision geared movements making leveling a camera platform child’s play, all on an extremely stable and secure platform.  When photographing in the shivering cold, a geared head makes leveling the camera much easier than with a traditional ballhead. Similarly, making fine adjustments in studio is also easier with a geared tripod head.

The Cube was a worthwhile investment to me. But the Cube is far from perfect. High price aside, the Cube is heavy, weighing approximately 2.25 pounds. Its profile is relatively stout and markedly larger than its non-geared heavy duty ballhead cousins. While the Cube promises precise geared adjustments, it also sacrifices the speed of a traditional ballhead. As good as the Cube was (and still is) mounted on a Really Right Stuff TVC 3 series carbon fiber tripod, I found that the Cube was top-heavy on my lighter RRS TVC-24 tripod which I use for hiking and travel. I wanted the quality and capabilities of the Cube, but in a smaller and lighter package. And so the search began for a geared tripod head alternative.

Before discussing the merits and shortcomings of the KPS T5 geared ballhead, I think it is necessary for me to first disclose the parameters for what I consider to be an acceptable tripod head. The tripod head must be capable of providing a secure and stable platform for a moderately heavy camera system, primarily a Cambo WRS technical camera, Rodenstock lenses, Phase One medium format digital back, and sometimes also supporting tethering with a Surface Pro tablet. Other alternate camera platforms might be a Phase One DF medium format digital DSLR, or a “professional” 1D series Canon DSLR with a long lens. These are heavier platforms, and generally much more expensive systems than may be considered typical, and worrying about whether your tripod head can safely support such expensive gear should not be even the slightest concern. Mounting and leveling the camera platform should be an easy task, with adjustments made smoothly and quickly. In short, the photographer should be able to focus on the process of photography and not have the slightest worry about the tripod head that supports his expensive camera system. In a nutshell, I want AS Cube-like quality and stability in a smaller, lighter package. I wanted a geared tripod head that bestowed all the Cube’s benefits afforded to my Cambo technical camera, and preferably less expensive too.  Simple, right?

The Arca Swiss Cube is considered by many to be the pinnacle of quality for geared tripod heads. As such, the Cube naturally set the standard by which to compare other geared options, including the KPS T5 in this review.  Manfrotto’s 405, 410, and their new xpro geared heads?  Not in the running for this level of desired quality. The Manfrotto’s paltry maximum of 16 pounds of support (even less for their new xpro) falls far short compared to the Cube’s 100+lb rating.  Sunwayfoto’s GH-Pro is a smaller, lighter, and less expensive version of the Arca Swiss D4, but its 26 pound capacity rating is rather optimistic and I found it much more acceptable for a small, mirrorless camera-sized platform. Both the AS D4 and GH-Pro exhibit lift inherent in their design and are not as stable as the standard set forth by the Cube. I did not consider the Photoflex Clam nor Linhof’s 3D Micro as both are very similar to the Cube in size and weight, not to mention expensive as well.   Enter the KPS T5 geared ballhead.

The KPS T5-DV packaged alongside KPS proprietary Slim Plates.

The KPS T5 Geared BallHead

KPS Research & Design is a small Korean company, owned by P.S. Kang. Kang’s background as an engineer and designer of custom industrial machinery carried over into establishing KPS. An artist and photographer at heart, Kang started developing and making photographic equipment, initially with viewfinders for DSLRs and later introducing the KPS Slim Plate system. A T5 geared ballhead prototype was introduced at Photokina in 2010 and became available to the public in 2012 and recently in the US. The T5 geared ballhead is unique in my mind as it is not a knock-off or carbon copy of pre-existing technologies. There really is nothing else currently on the market quite like it. This is not a cheap or inexpensive head. With the T5, KPS has clearly set its sights on the higher quality end of the photography market. If I had to describe a point of quality reference, I would place the fit and finish of the T5 on par with products from Arca Swiss and Really Right Stuff.  The U.S. distributor for the KPS T5 is Legio Aerium, located in Elkridge, Maryland. www.legioaerium.com  Legio Aerium is a veteran owned business.

 T5-DV with lever quick release on left; T5D with screw clamp on right. Both are Arca Swiss compatible. The T5DV also uses the KPS proprietary Slim Plate.

T5-DV with lever quick release on left; T5D with screw clamp on right. Both are Arca Swiss compatible. The T5DV also uses the KPS proprietary Slim Plate.

I received two geared ballheads from Legio Aerium to test: the T5D with screw clamp and the T5DV with quick lever release clamp. Both are Arca Swiss compatible, but the T5DV also uses KPS’ proprietary Slim Plates as well.  The T5DV includes a generic KPS Slim Plate. Legio Aerium also included several other KPS Slim Plates for a mirrorless camera and professional DSLR body. More on the KPS slim plates later.  The T5 head came well-packaged in cut foam placed inside of an elegant box. No “Coach” leather bag, but certainly better than a corrugated cardboard box. A small pamphlet is included that explains how to operate the T5.  This is much better than the poorly photocopied instructions that came with my Cube! I used the T5 geared ballheads for a period of approximately five weeks both in studio and on location. I will be taking the T5 geared ballheads with me to Capture Integration in Lake Tahoe, a workshop I lead with Don Libby of Tucson, Arizona.

I related to Legio Aerium my disdain for the needless use of permanent red Loctite, making it much more difficult for end-users to install the top clamp of their own choosing. Users must resort to a heat gun to release the adhesive and risk causing damage to the tripod head. I do believe that Arca Swiss has lost many potential sales of their venerable Cube and D4 heads when they recently opted for the use of red Loctite to prevent end-users from using anything but the stock AS top clamps. This rather shallow approach really misses the forest for the trees. Legio Aerium agreed. KPS is sending me a T5 geared ballhead at my request without a top-clamp, and machined to my specifications, so that I can freely swap between RRS lever clamps and a panoramic lever clamp. Responsive customer service? Make that an emphatic, “yes.”  Legio Aerium has informed me that KPS will offer the T5 geared ballhead in several clamp versions, including the same T5 that I requested without a top-clamp.  Smart move. Having a choice is a good thing. Pricing for the T5 ranges from approximately $730 (without clamp), $800 for the T5D AS screw clamp, and $830 for the T5DV quick lever release clamp.  The T5 geared ballhead is guaranteed free of defects in materials and workmanship for three years.

T5-DV, Arca Swiss Cube, and T5-D

T5-DV, Arca Swiss Cube, and T5-D

The Details

The T5 is a finely machined tripod head, approximately 5 inches tall, 2.5” in diameter, and weighs about 1.75 pounds. It has a 44mm ball with a rated capacity of 88lbs. The finish is a smooth matte black. It has a lockable panning base, with numerical settings marked every 30 degrees, and markings every 10 degrees between each numerical setting. There are three main knobs that control adjustments on the T5. The larger black knob controls the head much like any other typical ballhead. The friction lock may be adjusted as desired for the weight of the camera. Initial setting of the camera with the large knob is quick and easy. What makes the T5 unique is that the two smaller red knobs can make minute geared micro-tilt adjustments on two axes as much as 30 degrees total depending on the position where the ball has been locked down.  Leveling the camera is as quick and easy as with the Arca Swiss Cube.

Calla Lillies at Garrapata State Beach. Cambo WRS mounted on KPS T5DV geared ballhead and RRS TVC-24 tripod. Phase One IQ180 tethered to Surface Pro 2 with Wolf clamp, KPS T5DV geared ballhead and TVC-24 tripod.

Calla Lillies at Garrapata State Beach. Cambo WRS mounted on KPS T5DV geared ballhead and RRS TVC-24 tripod. Phase One IQ180 tethered to Surface Pro 2 with Wolf clamp, KPS T5DV geared ballhead and TVC-24 tripod.

I found that once the T5 head was adjusted for the weight of my camera, I typically would only need to secure my camera onto the ballhead and could go directly to making minor geared adjustments to level the camera with the two red knobs. Only if large adjustments are needed did I resort to using the larger main control knob. The knobs are much bigger than those found on the Arca Swiss Cube, and when making adjustments with gloved hands, this is a welcome feature. Depending on the position of the head, however, it can take as much as half a turn of the red knobs before the T5 gears are engaged to make minor adjustments, whereas the response of the knobs on the Cube when making adjustments are immediate. This has no impact on the ability to make fine adjustments or on the stability of the platform, rather I think this is more the nature of the geared mechanism moving to engage the ballhead. The knobs on the Cube to make adjustments extend from one side of the head to the other, making adjustments easy whether the user is left or right-handed. Consequently, both hands can also be used together on the same axis control knobs, making very fine adjustments on the Cube easier than on the T5. Adjustments to level the camera platform with both the Cube and T5 are smooth and fast. The KPS T5 provided a very stable platform for both my Phase DF and Cambo WRS technical cameras. Movements and controls are smooth and refined on the T5 as should be expected.  The video clip below demonstrates leveling with the KPS T5DV geared ballhead and with the AS Cube.

https://youtu.be/Y-ceazygCDk 

Other than the numerical markers on the panning base, there are no other markings or numbers on the T5. In contrast, the Cube has numerical markers to note the amount of adjustments made along both the x and y axis. Because of the fluidity and movement of the T5 ballhead, like any ballhead, it would be impossible to note with any sense of accuracy the amount of adjustment made along the x or y axis with the T5. I do not find this to be a significant feature in my work. The T5DV lever clamp has two bubble levels. The T5D screw clamp has a single bubble level.  The Cube has two bubble levels. I find that relying on the electronic dual axis levels, found on the Phase One IQ series medium format digital backs and other digital cameras, when making adjustments is easier than using the bubble levels found on the tripod head.

Of significant note is that although the KPS T5 weighs about ½ pound less than the Arca Swiss Cube, I felt that I had not sacrificed anything in terms of a stable platform for my cameras. The standard that I use for a tripod and head is that I should not have to worry about the stability of the platform nor the fear that my camera may crash to the ground at any given moment. I should not have to think about the tripod or the attached head. The photographer need only focus on the task at hand.  I feel equally secure using the Cube and the KPS T5 geared ballhead. The biggest concern that I had was that the T5DV, like the Cube, might be top heavy when used with the smaller and lighter RRS TVC-24 carbon fiber tripod legs. I feared that although it was ½ pound lighter, that it still might not be light enough yet.  My fears were not realized as I have found that the KPS T5 is well-balanced mounted on top of both the TVC 2 and TVC 3 series tripods.  I installed RRS TH-DVTL40 dovetails on the Cube and the T5 heads which allows me to quickly swap heads and tripod legs using RRS quick release lever clamps (aka the Graham Welland quick lever release tripod head system).

Slim plate and Arca Swiss compatible plate; 1Ds Mark III shown with Slim Plate attached and also with RRS L-bracket attached.

 The KPS Slim Plate System

The T5 comes in four variants: T5, T5M, T5D, and the T5DV. All are the same and only differentiated by the type of attached clamp (or no clamp for the T5). I did not test the T5M. All of the variants are Arca Swiss compatible. The T5DV and T5M also use the KPS Slim Plate system. Rather than clamping the outside rails as the Arca Swiss standard, the Slim Plate system is secured by clamping two rails along the inside of the plate. This novel design allows the system to have a much lower profile and take on a nice body hugging design. The clamping system is secure and clamp force is easily adjustable. The Slim Plate system is well-engineered and works well, but I decided that it is not right for me. I have multiple cameras, most with L-brackets, all of which by deliberate choice use Arca Swiss compatible RRS brackets and plates. This consistency allows me to easily use each of my cameras on all of my tripods with ease. KPS does not offer a “slim plate” L-bracket and consequently Slim Plates are not an option for me. As you can see from the photos above, the Slim Plate design is much smaller in profile. For those wishing to maintain a smaller camera profile, the KPS Slim Plate should be considered. A single Slim Plate attached to the bottom of a camera is substantially less obtrusive. I would estimate that the Slim Plate system is about half the thickness of a typical Arca Swiss compatible plate. The difference is more noticeable on smaller cameras such as a Sony A7r. The photo above shows the fit and finish of the Slim Plate attached to my Canon 1Ds Mark III compared to the bulk added by an Arca Swiss compatible RRS L-bracket. When considering its low profile fit, weight, and less bulk that the KPS Slim Plate has on a large DSLR like the Canon 1DsMark III, it really is remarkable. A line of sleek, low-profile, form-fitting, Slim-Plate L-brackets would really give a lot of photographers pause to reconsider.

Layout of the T5DV clamp

Layout of the T5DV clamp

The only issue I found, albeit minor, was with the T5DV clamp. Setting the clamp to be Arca Swiss compatible is easily and quickly accomplished by moving a single stainless steel pin from one setting to the other. However, in so doing, the camera plate is then slightly off center above the ball stem. This is not the case when using the Slim Plate system. This may or may not be an issue for some photographers. Regardless, the clamp does work well and overall I liked the speed of working with the T5DV lever release clamp better than the T5D screw clamp. My preference overall, however, is being able to attach the clamp of my choice using the base model T5.

Moss Landing Power Plant. ©2015 Ken Doo. Cambo WRS, Phase IQ180, Rodenstock HR70 t/s two-image vertical stitch. KPS T5DV geared ballhead on RRS TVC24. Thirty-four second exposure.

Moss Landing Power Plant. ©2015 Ken Doo. Cambo WRS, Phase IQ180, Rodenstock HR70 t/s two-image vertical stitch. KPS T5DV geared ballhead on RRS TVC24. Thirty-four second exposure.

Conclusion

Over the past five weeks I have used the KPS T5 geared ballhead in a variety of situations including portrait sessions, products, and landscape photography. I rarely use the Cube during portrait sessions because making adjustments is too slow. The speed of a ballhead during a portrait session important, yet still being able to make small adjustments during the session with the T5 was a pleasant surprise.  The T5 combines the benefits of a ballhead with the precision of a geared head. For those who already have the Arca Swiss Cube, buying the KPS T5 geared ballhead may not make sense unless your work requires a lighter geared head alternative that is capable of providing a stable platform for a larger DSLR or medium format camera system.  For those that have not yet succumbed to the Cube, the KPS T5 geared ballhead is a great high quality alternative. It may not come with a “Coach” leather bag, but the T5 provides similar quality and features, and at half the price of admission. My search for a smaller and lighter, geared ballhead has ended.  –Ken Doo, April 2015

Ken Doo is a professional photographer with a boutique portrait studio located in Carmel, California. He is also is a fine art printer and recently launched his new fine art printing website, www.carmelfineartprinting.com  From Vision to Print— order your photos on canvas and fine art papers online!  (831) 626-1844.

UPDATE! I just received a new KPS T5 “improved” geared ballhead prototype on December 31, 2015.  Okay, it’s really not a substantial material improvement in my opinion, but it does show that KPS has some mad engineering skills and is very receptive to offering an exceptionally high quality, mature, and polished product.  The new T5 no longer features a minimum friction control on the main knob. Instead, KPS has engineered “Click-stop” settings from 1-2-3 on the main knob. The user simply adjusts the ballhead and then tightens the main adjustment knob until the first click-setting or “1” on the knob. This insures that the camera is held in place and the microadjustment functions will operate optimally as designed.  Pretty neat.  Users with heavier cameras such as the Phase One XF may find themselves using click settings 2 or 3.

_O7E1105

New KPS T5 geared head prototype with click-stop functions on the main adjustment knob.

The KPS T5 geared ballhead remains my head of choice on my RRS TVC-24 CF tripod.  I don’t see a need to upgrade my T5 for the new “click-stop” features, but it certainly will be a welcome addition for new users.  The KPS T5 geared ballhead may be purchased through the U.S. distributor for KPS at www.legioaerium.com .  I have been promised a few KPS T5 ballheads will be available at Capture Integration’s medium format digital workshop in February, the seventh annual CI in Carmel 2016.